Desiderata (English Poem)

Published on Mar 20, 2013 Desiderata (Latin: Desideratum "desired things") it's an inspirational poem written by Max Ehrmann. Max Ehrmann was born in Terre Haute, Indiana, on September 16, 1872. His parents were German immigrants. Ehrmann graduated from DePauw University in Greencastle in 1894, after which he studied law and philosophy at Harvard University. Ehrmann returned to Terre Haute to practice law, following which (early 1900's) he began writing, apparently obsessively. Max Ehrmann was known as the 'Poet Laureate' of Terre Haute. Ehrmann included Desiderata in a Christmas message to his friends in 1933, and significantly never added any copyright notice, a factor which featured strongly in legal considerations in the 1970's about Desiderata copyright (more below). Ehrmann wrote many poems, although none became well known until after his death. Aside from Desiderata his most famous poem is A Prayer, written in 1906. Max married Bertha three months before his death in 1945. Bertha Scott King Ehrmann was from New York; she graduated from Smith College, wrote, taught, and published a book called The Worth of a Girl. Three months after Max Ehrmann's death, Bertha published four of his books. Max Ehrmann's widow Bertha published the Desiderata poem with some other of his work in 1948, in a collection titled The Poems Of Max Ehrmann. Seemingly in 1959 (some say 1957) Reverend Frederick Kates produced around just 200 copies of his inspirational works collection featuring Desiderata, which sparked the confusion and myth that endures today. By the late 1970's Old St Paul's Church was receiving 40 enquiries a week as to the origins of the Desiderata poem. A copy of the Desiderata poem (a version linked to 1692 and The Old St Paul's Church) was found on Democratic politician Adlai Stevenson's bedside table after his death in 1965 - supposedly Stevenson was intending to use what he believed to be the ancient poem in his Christmas cards, and this much publicised discovery did much to increase the fame and myth of Desidarata. Confusion has surrounded Desiderata copyright and usage and whether or not the poem is in the public domain. The court decided on 14 May 1976 in favour of Combined Registry Company. Music: Opne your mind, Antonino Imanuel. © All rights reserved. https://www.youtube.com/user/antonino... https://www.facebook.com/pages/Antoni... I express my gratitude to Antonino Imanuel for allowing me to use his beautiful music for the creation of this video. Creation video: By Reflexibiza. HD Video

Posted by Living Empowered® on August 10, 2013 at 10:46 AM 1153 Views

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